Expert Homemade Carp Boilie Bait Flavour And Irresistible Oil Edges!-zuczug

Catching winter fish and fish in tough late summer conditions takes a special approach so here are some bait tips refined from years of winter include unique tips on potent stimulants and flavours and their .ponents, and on nutritional liquid additives and their uses and applications. Apply all these tips and insights creatively to your homemade and readymade baits and catch more big fish right now! Concentrated flavours are not the only useful bait substances to boost baits of many formats for improved winter success. In fact in some fishing situations some substances can be too soluble and actually leach out of baits too fast as they have infinite solubility, as in the case of glycerol dominated flavours, for example. It is wise to try mixing flavours and other substances so your flavours all leach out at different rates, leaving some concentrated attraction in the proximity of the bait. Using pure glycerine, vodka, and a mixture of concentrated sweetener and molasses and marmite, soluble fish protein and lactose, for instance, is a little bit alternative and produces different effects and impacts at different ranges. For an easy homemade method or stick-type mixes, just make a breadcrumb based fluffy mixture dampened with your unique liquids to produce a ground bait mixture that will disperse easily, releasing soluble attraction and food particles into the water column and attract carp like mad! Using anything, from hemp oil to olive oil, and fruit oils etc in your mix, will get particles to pull fish down from upper layers better as the oil will tend to rise in water. An easy way to make an alternative, highly over-flavoured area for winter fishing is to mix breadcrumbs with the old favourite Nesquick powdered milk shake. I really like using extra sweetened oils of many forms, provided they are mixed with liquid lecithins, but I advise you to avoid bulk fish and marine oils that simply solidify in low temperatures – test in the fridge or outside overnight using a thermometer if you are unsure. While actually fishing and testing oils, I have found a thermometer placed in oils in a pot in the water is quite enlightening! Fruit oils are quite easily available online, and you do not always have to go to fishing bait .panies for something slightly different or alternative after all, that is one of the greatest proven edges in carp fishing! Using oils in PVA products such as PVA bag and PVA netting etc lessens the chances of your PVA melting. If in doubt try some of the PVA-friendly products available from bait .panies, such as CC Moore who have designed their products with this feature beneficially in mind. In really low winter temperatures, solubility really is a great factor that can be leveraged, and in such conditions it is often pointless using a conventional boiled bait coated in paste, when you can use paste on the rig and know every part of your bait really is working for you (and is not rendered ineffective due to being sealed inside coagulated protein formed by heating of the bait!) I will not go into which bait products to use here because there are so many excellent ones for winter and spring fishing to choose from but one key aspect in choosing substance is how well they will disperse in water – and most especially in cold water! To find this out just get samples and mix them with cold water. In a way it is like testing salt against betaine crystals or whole milk powders against various caseins, semolina or maize flour – or against malt extract, for instance. If you want a more resilient paste (or make different homemade boilies), just add a small proportion of whole egg powder in your powder mixture or even use whey gel, if you are into that kind of bait texture and feel and effect etc. Ultimately, you can make baits that do not need to be sealed by loads and loads of whole liquid egg, and if you use egg, one tip is to reduce its content in baits by adding water in the same volume as half the eggs you might normally use in a summer bait, for example. It is a little known fact that winter carp baits do not require a protein content of even 30 percent to be very effective indeed. In fact, anyone who is a little snobbish about using a winter bait based on breadcrumbs needs to make some homemade baits with them, adding some liquid foods, perhaps some flavour .ponents, and highly soluble protein extracts (in high levels) as you would for a more costlier boilie recipes, and use these baits as paste, with total confidence! A great little tip I have used with lots of success in low temperature conditions is to place next to a paste or steamed or boiled bait a piece of luncheon meat soaked in a neat essential oil (or mixtures of oils, palatants, enhancers, liquid proteins, flavours etc). The cheaper brands of luncheon meat tends to contain less protein, less fat and more water and more salt; these are far more water soluble, which is very useful in winter time! High PC liquid lecithin is an essential .ponent of cold water baits for me, as a proven feeding trigger, emulsifying oils and improving bait digestion and substance hydration and dispersal among other benefits! The meat eventually softens and provides another very attractive reason for Mr Carp to suck in your rig! Providing carp with a rig that has an odd shaped meat bait and an odd shaped homemade boiled or steamed bait is an idea I re.mend you try for winter and also to trip up more wary fish! If you want to avoid as many disappointing blank cold water fishing sessions as possible then now is the time to make the most of alternative bait and rig tactics that really pull fish to your hook baits even more effectively than usual; read on now and catch more cold water fish! If the small lake outside my kitchen window about to freeze over this winter again then this is an ideal time to experiment with baits for such conditions! Water density is a very interesting thing because around the point of freezing, water density changes. This makes the formation of ice and thawing out of lakes quite an exciting time because carp respond to the water density changes. It is well known for carp to break the rules of anglers incorrect expectations and many winter carp get caught right at the points and locations in lakes where active icing over and defrosting is taking place. It may be cold but the water density is very often the more important factor in fish feeding behaviour! When winter and spring water temperatures struggle to get above 3 to 6 degrees, for example, it can be really tough to get bites. Part of the problem is achieving the correct, most suitable concentration of stimulating signals pumping from your baits to the fish to actually make them aware of the potential food source nearby that is actually worth the energy expenditure, or even in regards to the possible digestion of bait in such conditions! Consider that maggots will slow down their movements pretty quickly and will have already dumped their initial burst of excreted ammonia and amino acids etc into the water upon their initial introduction – leaving little to attract fish onwards! It is no surprise that most often concentrated pastes will out-fish boilies, pellets and live baits after initial introduction. It shocks me when I read about people like Ian Chilcott talking about having to go onto maggots in cold water conditions from his favourite readymade boilies; he just needs to understand more about bait formats and substances and how they work in different ways in solution, and in regards to fish external and internal systems. Maggots are far from being the automatic or best solution. All too many carp anglers, especially those of the instant angler-readymade bait culture, often through no fault of their own, are stuck in a limited mindset of popularised paradigms of what carp baits are and how to use them. For example, the average carp angler will expect to see yellow pineapple boilies, Day-Glow pink shrimp boilies, yellow chocolate malt boilies or red fish boilies. But just because you don’t see many readymade black Scopex and banana or pineapple baits does not mean they are not highly effective! To me, colour is one of the lesser considerations in bait. Most readymade baits are under-optimised in terms of natural-stimulation concentration and release, so it is no surprise it appears that sight-feeding carp prefer lighter tones of boilies. But how many anglers have overlooked the fact that halibut marine-type pellets are very dark, yet famously effective, with zero glow in the dark gimmickry! The fact is there are no hard and fast rules to getting hooks into the mouths of carp using bait leverage – because carp are constantly adapting individuals, programmed to survive, using any adaptation techniques they can, including monopolising new food sources, avoiding hard, highly flavoured, or more familiar round, barrel or pellet shaped baits and all too familiar baiting situations and swim activity. We need to keep a constantly changing, open mind to be consistently successful anglers. Do not be lazy in your thinking, looking for instant and quick fixes that just do not last! Winter fishing is far harder work mentally than any other fishing! In winter and spring fishing, many carp anglers are unaware that you can fish with alternative soluble baits that remain intact for significant lengths of time, and can even be adapted to last longer with unique effects. It seems to me that the average guy on the bank expects his readymade bait to last intact on a rig at least 12 to 36 hours, or even longer. But to me, if a bait only lasts about 4 hours immersion in very cold water, then this is absolutely ideal, as it means the bait is actually effectively dispersing and pumping itself into the water to maximum effect! You do not always want to ‘play it safe and wrap a readymade bait in paste, using one of a pretty limited number of very similar hair rigs, and pretty standard hook link lengths and materials; all of which are retrain carp to be even more cautious every time they are used! But I have caught enough big, wary winter and spring fish using paste (directly on the hook without any hair rig,) to know it can out-fish pellets and boilies and maggots on hair rigs for one thing because fish are simply never expecting this approach! Of course, I do things with my hook link to make certain the hook point is long enough and thin enough and angled just right for maximum immediate penetration upon contact. I manually sharpen my hooks sharper than any chemically-sharpened hook on the market today; but then for me, it is those critical first 4 millimetres of hook point that matter most in fishing. For 5 years at least, I had a significant amount of time away from carp fishing, while researching for my ebooks and tuition, and been focusing on river fishing. I have done this for various personal reasons, but it has given me a much a fresher perspective on carp fishing baits and baiting applications, and also creativity in solving problems by doing this! The moving water in the river strips concentrations of leaching substances from baits very quickly, just as it does when using worms in beach fishing; the first 15 minutes are the peak time, when the highest concentration of naturally attractive substances and feeding triggers are dispersing into the water currents. Due to changes in water densities and other factors in rivers, winter baits need special properties if they are to be far more productive than usual but this is not limited just to using extra-soluble substances but also relates to others aspects such as substances that carp most easily detect in very low concentrations, as well as things like special substances that will provide a sudden behavioural change or metabolic or energy-boost when detected – even in low doses. Certain flavour .ponents and .binations will do this just on their own, while bait additives and ingredients add to this effect in many ways for longer durations, with better leaching and attraction and stimulation properties. Extremely effective cold water baits are basically two way pumps that take in water that replaces bait substances within the bait, and in this exchange, pump out stimulation and attraction substances in concentrations that fish easily detect in the water solution contacting them (even at range). Ionic exchange is central to much of this, although certainly not limited to it, as this is only one way baits operate in water and on fish senses. The way substances trigger carp receptors in different places on and in the body are also an important part of the success equation, but how a bait impacts all senses simultaneously or just one aspect can be a key to success also. Well over 90 percent of all readymade baits are not optimised and maximised to achieve these effects, so the ionic exchange and hence the impact of the bait .ponents on the water is not great, due to design and profitability constraints, and also angler expectations of how the bait will behave in the water. But of course the homemade bait maker, doing things on a smaller scale, has no such restrictions and can choose substances to significantly boost the bait’s properties, for maximum impact and effect! For instance, when I am sensing and assessing a bait or new potential bait substance (or substances in .bination.) some substances get active or change their chemical structure and are much more noticeable when .bined), for me it is not about a tongue taste or a .bined nose or tongue impact that is important but a deep gut reaction. Some substances are almost invisible to the senses when used on their own but in .binations with others can be made far more active or potent in impact and effect. For instance, certain flavours and sugars have little effect on carp responses but when used in synergistic ways they can make all the difference to your success! There are in fact very many tricks, tactics, methods etc to achieve improved fish responses in colder water, and conversely in warmer water, in terms of bait designs and their modes of action, fishing styles, ground bait and other free bait characteristics, and how they are applied. Very many types of bait can actually be made on the bank; all you need are your ready-prepared base mixes and liquids. Such made on the bank baits have caught for me many big carp, where the cold conditions have failed to produce fish on boilies (and even on live baits such as maggots!) These baits are superior to maggots! Very viscous and extremely soluble substances are very useful in cold conditions. Although it may sound strange but some substances that are 99 percent insoluble are also very useful in achieving bites, most especially if they are emulsified or partly emulsified using liquid lecithins. Glycerol or glycerine is a very useful substance because it mixes with water in effect 100 percent, and many successful flavours are based on it. Alcohol flavours too are highly water soluble so will travel easily from your bait, so forming a concentration gradient that carp can home in on. Personally, I find mixing glycerol and alcohol based flavours with ones primarily natural ester based or others, natural or nature identical, or diacetin types, are very successful. You can even boost a propylene glycol based flavour by cutting it with vodka and natural raspberry puree, and a probiotic agent such as marmite, very rich in taste-enhancing factors for instance, and adding Talin as an electrostatic carrier, to produce a very unique homemade flavour! I have been doing this kind of experimentation for my baits, both homemade and readymade, since the 70s – because it works. But of course concentrated flavours are not the only useful substances; and some substances can be too soluble and actually leach out of baits too fast as they have infinite solubility, as in the case of glycerol dominated flavours, for example. It is wise to try mixing flavours and other substances so your flavours all leach out at different rates, leaving some concentrated attraction in the proximity of the bait. Using pure glycerine, vodka, and a mixture of concentrated sweetener and molasses and marmite, soluble fish protein and lactose, for instance, is a little bit alternative and produces different effects and impacts at different ranges. For an easy homemade method or stick-type mixes, just make a breadcrumb based fluffy mixture dampened with your unique liquids to produce a ground bait mixture that will disperse easily, releasing soluble attraction and food particles into the water column and attract carp like mad! Using anything, from hemp oil to olive oil, and fruit oils etc in your mix, will get particles to pull fish down from upper layers better as the oil will tend to rise in water. An easy way to make an alternative, highly over-flavoured area for winter fishing is to mix breadcrumbs with the old favourite Nesquick powdered milk shake. I really like using extra sweetened oils of many forms, provided they are mixed with liquid lecithins, but I advise you to avoid bulk fish and marine oils that simply solidify in low temperatures. Test your oils in the fridge or outside overnight using a thermometer if you are unsure! While actually fishing and testing oils, I have found a thermometer placed in oils in a pot in the water is quite enlightening! Fruit oils are quite easily available online, and you do not always have to go to fishing bait .panies for something slightly different or alternative after all, that is one of the greatest proven edges in carp fishing! With your oils, I re.mend using high PC liquid lecithin. One particular homemade winter and spring test paste bait I have created contains a high level of long-range attractors that stimulate protein-orientated feeding, plus it contains hemp oil and highly water-soluble additives and ingredients. In my cold water in a glass bait testing, this paste bait breaks down in an hour, releasing a potent red (and also clear) halo of attraction and stimulation for fish to easily home in on when used when fished as hook baits or as free baits! Note that such baits are maximised in terms of be.ing solution in other words they literally be.e solution .pletely producing the most concentrated solution possible in my desired duration of immersion. Specifically designed homemade bait formulation can turn the water to a suspension of semi and fully water soluble attraction to seriously stimulate feeding! Using oils in PVA products such as PVA bag and PVA netting etc lessens the chances of your PVA melting. If in doubt try some of the PVA-friendly products available from bait .panies, such as CC Moore who have designed their products with this feature beneficially in mind. In really 相关的主题文章: